Tag: path of totality

30 Mar 2021

Community Eclipse Planning – Zoom workshop 9-10 April 2021

 

I’ve been chasing total eclipses for over 20 years.  While waiting for each chase, I usually channel my energies into community eclipse planning and working behind-the-scenes on projects for future eclipses.

Despite living in Australia, I am a member of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Solar Eclipse Task Force, which is the key supporting organization for solar eclipse planning across the US.  We have been meeting via Zoom regularly and are working towards future eclipse coordination in the US.

Plans are now ramping up in preparation for the next total solar eclipse visible across the US, including Mexico and Canada, on 8 April 2024.   If you thought the ‘Great American Eclipse of 2017’ was huge, then be aware that was just the warm-up.  With so much more awareness, the ‘Greater North American Total Solar Eclipse of 2024’ is going to be huge!   And an added bonus – an annular (‘ring’) solar eclipse will be visible across the US and parts of Mexico the year before, on 14 October 2023.   Make sure to mark these dates in your diary.

This means community eclipse planning needs to start NOW for all communities who find themselves in the Moon’s shadow in 2023 and/or 2024.

To help you with this, the AAS Solar Eclipse Task Force is hosting the next planning weekend workshop via Zoom on Friday and Saturday, 9 and 10 April 2021, to coincide with the three-year countdown to the total eclipse in 2024.   This online workshop will be of interest to anyone who needs to be involved in preparations for these two solar eclipses, and there is a great line-up of experienced presenters who are keen to support you.  Day 1 of the workshop will provide a detailed overview of these solar eclipse opportunities across the US, and guidance about eye safety.  Day 2 of the workshop is dedicated to eclipse planning.  I will be delivering a presentation on community eclipse planning on Day 2, and then taking part in a panel discussion on the topic that will also feature others who will be sharing their planning experience from 2017.

There is a low fee of $20 to take part in the weekend workshop. Please CLICK HERE for more detailed information, any questions, and to register your attendance.  If you cannot attend this workshop, then make sure to still link in with the Eclipse Task Force to be kept informed of future planning workshops.

I’ve been guiding and researching community eclipse planning for many years now, and my top three nuggets of advice based upon my own direct experience and the many, many hindsight interviews I have done after each eclipse:   start planning early;  focus on the community; and consult with eclipse experts.   This workshop will help you get started – you will be warmly welcomed by the Solar Eclipse Task Force, and you will have an opportunity to connect with others who are also starting out with their planning too.   I look forward to seeing you there.

11 Jan 2015

Top 10 madness that is the new year

 

Eclipse chasing isn't just about the eclipse.  Mongolia 2008 © Kate Russo
Eclipse chasing isn’t just about the eclipse. Mongolia 2008 © Kate Russo

You cannot open a newspaper, read a magazine or go online lately without seeing a list of ‘top 10’ things to do or places to go this year.

What was especially noticeable this year was the presence of ‘seeing a total solar eclipse’ on most of these lists.   I can’t recall any other time when eclipse chasing appeared to be so high on the agenda. I suspect the main driver for this is the fact that in 2017 the path of totality makes its way across North America from west to east coast, and as a result public interest is at an all time high.

I absolutely agree that seeing a total solar eclipse is worthy of being on everyone’s aspiration list. The experience is other-worldly and beyond expectation. If you have not seen one, then you will not truly understand the buzz and experience until you are standing in the shadow of the Moon, mouth agog and the hair on the back of your neck standing up at sublime beauty of totality.   It is at this moment that you will ask yourself why you took so long to see one.

If seeing these ‘top 10’ lists have whetted your appetite for eclipse chasing, then you would have noticed that your 2015 options for land based eclipse viewing is limited – either the remote Faroe Islands, or rugged Svalbard. The eclipse in March is a little off-season for visiting both of these arctic locations. Despite this, many intrepid and die-hard chasers, and those seeking out-of-the-way adventures, have already planned their trips and soon will be packing their warm clothing. I’ve been banging on about the Faroe Islands now for two years!

But what if you feel the locations on offer are too challenging to get to, too expensive, or if you are not interested in cold weather viewing? Then you may like to know that 2016 might be a better year for you to have your eclipse experience. There are two reasons for this.

Firstly, the path of totality for the total solar eclipse of March 2016 goes right across Indonesia. There are some fabulous travel opportunities with tours being arranged on land and sea. Whatever your preference – exotic, luxury, adventure, or completely off-the-beaten track, you will find interesting options. I will be heading to Sulawesi to see this (my 10th) total eclipse, and attending an Eclipse Festival where I will be able to do further research about the eclipse experience, while experiencing this amazingly diverse country.

Secondly, there is a second eclipse option – an annular solar eclipse takes place in September 2016. An annular eclipse is not as dramatic as a total eclipse (see my article here for the difference), but it is still an amazing sight to see the ‘ring of fire’ as the Moon almost covers the Sun. As in a total eclipse, you have to be within the path of annularity to see the ring of fire, which passes across central Africa, Madagascar and beyond. Top of the pick is Tanzania, where the eclipse coincides with the wildebeest migration, so it will be all about nature and wildlife.

So, if you have already ruled out an arctic total solar eclipse for this year, then make sure to explore options for chasing eclipses for 2016. But get in before those ‘top 10’ lists are published next year – I suspect if you wait for these lists to appear you may well miss the boat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

20 May 2012

10 hours to go until the annular eclipse

In just over ten hours, the annular eclipse of 2012 will begin at sunrise in China.  The shadow of the moon will make it’s way across the earth, across the pacific and over the western part of North America until sunset in Texas.   I plan to watch the event on live webcasts – something that I have not done before.  You see, I am usually on the ground eagerly awaiting the arrival of the shadow.  So this will be quite a different experience.  I wonder if I will also share the excitement, thrill and goosebumps watching it unfold live. 

I can see a few advantages actually.   I have none of the anxiety associated with what the cloud will be doing at the time of totality, as I will be sitting in the comfort of my living room in Belfast instead of at the mercy of sinister clouds. I also am able to view live webcasts from several locations across the path of totality – something that is obviously impossible to do live.  It is also easier on my bank account too.  I will be watching the feeds from China, Japan and the US, and have a wide range of choice regarding location based upon where people are providing their feeds from.  Currently I am thinking of using the http://events.slooh.com site which will be feeding live from Japan and then the US.  But I will spend a little time now searching for feeds provided by eclipse chasers I know, so I can feel perhaps a little more connected to the eclipse. 

But, as all eclipse chasers know, watching it on a screen in no way compares to being there and experiencing an eclipse. I might be comfortable, with no anxiety and lots of choice, but I am the one who is missing out.