Category: Annular eclipse May 2012

12 Aug 2012

Stunning image of the Annular Eclipse May 2012

I saw this image taken by Colleen Pinski a few weeks ago following the Annular eclipse in May 2012 across Asia and North America.  This picture of the eclipsed sun setting is one of the most stunning eclipse images I have ever seen.  There is not much for me to say about it – it speaks for itself.  This article describes how the image was taken.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2167595/Stunning-image-shows-boy-watching-solar-eclipse–taken-1-5-miles-away.html

 Copyright Colleen Pinski / National Geographic.

21 May 2012

Live feeds and zzzzz

I stayed up last night watching the webcasts for the annular eclipse, which commenced at around 11.30pm local time in Belfast.  I was certainly not alone – I noted that many of the feeds had audiences of hundreds of thousands of people, all eagerly awaiting a glimpse of totality.  Those poor Panasonic guys up on top of Mt Fuji – I’m sure it was still an amazing experience, but it did look rather miserable.  It was great to see the eclipse from a variety of feeds.  I found myself flicking across different feeds, and I have to confess that I became so tired that I did not actually see any live feeds of the eclipse making landfall in the US..   Thanks again to all those involved in live feeds – it is much appreciated.   Even if I did fall asleep.

20 May 2012

10 hours to go until the annular eclipse

In just over ten hours, the annular eclipse of 2012 will begin at sunrise in China.  The shadow of the moon will make it’s way across the earth, across the pacific and over the western part of North America until sunset in Texas.   I plan to watch the event on live webcasts – something that I have not done before.  You see, I am usually on the ground eagerly awaiting the arrival of the shadow.  So this will be quite a different experience.  I wonder if I will also share the excitement, thrill and goosebumps watching it unfold live. 

I can see a few advantages actually.   I have none of the anxiety associated with what the cloud will be doing at the time of totality, as I will be sitting in the comfort of my living room in Belfast instead of at the mercy of sinister clouds. I also am able to view live webcasts from several locations across the path of totality – something that is obviously impossible to do live.  It is also easier on my bank account too.  I will be watching the feeds from China, Japan and the US, and have a wide range of choice regarding location based upon where people are providing their feeds from.  Currently I am thinking of using the http://events.slooh.com site which will be feeding live from Japan and then the US.  But I will spend a little time now searching for feeds provided by eclipse chasers I know, so I can feel perhaps a little more connected to the eclipse. 

But, as all eclipse chasers know, watching it on a screen in no way compares to being there and experiencing an eclipse. I might be comfortable, with no anxiety and lots of choice, but I am the one who is missing out.

19 May 2012

My first blog…and on missing the Annular eclipse TOMORROW

I have finally taken the plunge and created my website. I’m not known for my technical abilities, so I am hoping that you will be forgiving especially in the first few months of this site. 

The timing of my website going live is a little disappointing – I have been working all weekend in a rather cold Belfast when on the other side of the world an annular eclipse is about to begin.  The path of this annular eclipse starts in China, goes through northern Taiwan, the south of Japan, and then continues across the Pacific and over to North America.  It will be the first eclipse that can be seen from North America for many years, and as a result there is quite a lot of excitement.  And I am here, in cold Belfast, setting up my website on eclipse chasing.  So wrong!  If it was a total eclipse, then nothing would have stopped me from jumping on a plane to be there.  Annular eclipses are fascinating and awesome in their own right, but do not involve some of the most dramatic features as seen in a total eclipse. So I shall just have to make do with watching webcasts.  :(